Davos, Scabbio: “Schools, business and private sector must work together. No to welfare measures”


Scabbio is sceptical about the introduction of Basic Income in Italy and the reform of job centres


Davos, Scabbio: “Schools, business and private sector must work together. No to welfare measures”

Following industry 4.0 it is the turn of globalisation 4.0. However, this time it won’t be competitive like the economic phase between the 20th and 21st centuries, but inclusive and cooperative in order to innovate at unprecedented speed and without pointless conflicts between nations. This was the key theme of the debates during the first two days of the Davos summit, an issue closely correlated with the future of work. For this reason ManpowerGroup was present at the meeting for the 14th year in a row. And understandably so, given the main topic of discussion this year.

During the meetings Chairman of ManpowerGroup Northern Mediterranean and Eastern Europe Operations Stefano Scabbio described how there are major readjustments taking place in the world: “We are witnessing a change that is occurring at unprecedented speed. We are in the middle of a revolution of skills that may have extremely positive implications both for individuals, who can continue to access training in order to remain employable, and for businesses, which can take advantage of this opportunity to begin growing again”. But as ManpowerGroup has been aware for several years, to achieve this there is still much more to be done: “We have to continue to provide training programmes so that workers remain attractive to employers, but this must be an ongoing, constant process”.

The results of the “Humans Wanted: Robots Need You” survey carried out by ManpowerGroup are encouraging: out of a sample of 19,000 businesses from 44 countries, 87% have decided to increase or at least maintain their workforce intact. In terms of expertise, computer skills are the most sought-after: 16% of businesses expect to increase their number of IT staff and 25% of manufacturing companies say that they want to hire new staff, also in customer services positions where empathy, adaptability and communication skills are key. For these reasons, Scabbio is sceptical about the introduction of Basic Income in Italy and the reform of job centres: “This is a welfare approach based on non-performing and inefficient structures, certainly not in line with the needs of companies and the market today. 35% of businesses can’t find the people they are looking for, a very disconcerting statistic. What we need is for schools, business and private sector entities like ManpowerGroup to come together to bridge this gap”.

The Chairman of ManpowerGroup Northern Mediterranean and Eastern Europe Operations does not fear the competition of the new-look job centres: “It is very unlikely that they will be able to compete with the private sector and its extensive expertise. It would take an almighty effort from the government to reform them and I don’t think this is possible given Italy’s large public debt”, concluded Scabbio.

L'autore

Matteo Muzio

Matteo Muzio Nato a Genova nel 1985, in tasca una laurea in storia contemporanea e una tessera di giornalista professionista. Ama scrivere di economia, di cultura e di altre varie ed eventuali. Ho scritto per le pagine genovesi di Repubblica, per il Foglio, L’Espresso e il Fatto Quotidiano. Scrive per il Corriere della Sera. Mi piacciono anche i treni, l’Appennino ligure, il cibo campano. Un po’ liberale, un po’ socialista.